Tag Archives: management

Managing Windows 2008 Server Core

In the interest of reducing overhead within my lab environment I decided to try and use Windows 2008 Server Core (R2/x64). If you’ve ever installed Server Core, the first thing you notice is you are only presented with a CMD shell at login, there is no full GUI. You can launch applications, installers, etc. however there is no Start Menu to assist you on your way.

I decided I’d chase this rabbit for a bit, as I am researching the use of Server Core in conjunction with vCloud Directory deployed vApp services…as a bloated UI heavy OS isn’t the most practical when it comes to “scale of cloud”, sure we have magical Transparent Page Sharing (for more info on TPS see: PDF written by Carl Warldspurger)…but just like energy efficiency, the easiest WATT to save is the one you never used. I know many of my fellow vGeeks have home labs, and very few of us have the host resources we’d like to have so we are all chasing efficiency, especially in regard to storage and host memory. In order to adapt to using Server Core you need to figure out how to manage it, so I thought I would write an article about what I have learned.

Sconfig.cmd

The first option Microsoft offers is the shell tool, Sconfig, “Server Configuration”, you can access this by running Sconfig.cmd from the CMD prompt.

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We can navigate this tool easily by inputing the number of the section we wish to view or modify. If we select #4 (Configure Remote Management) we are given the following subset of options:

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If you recall, by default almost all of the remote management tools are disabled on Windows. Likewise, the firewall is enabled and fairly restrictive. Being able to turn on these remote management options quickly so that we can move away from the console is always a benefit.

I went ahead and selected #1 Allow MMC Remote Management, remote MMC is pretty useful as it allows me to consolidate the management tasks between multiple target servers into one place. The window immediately indicated that it was configuring the firewall and enabling required services. It then gave a popup indicating the final status.

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I would personally prefer to not have the popup window that I then having to use a mouse to navigate to and select OK, my preference would have been for that status update and acknowledgement to be provided within the textual interface; I suppose I shouldn’t be surprised that a company that is bad at UI is even worse at shell. I will give them some credit, as Sconfig seems to have more intelligence than many of their GUI based wizards do, which often leave some tasks incomplete that must be manually finished in other wizards. Since this is my template I personally went ahead and enabled all of the remote management options to avoid having to do so later.

Core Configurator

The next tool which I found is Core Configurator, which can be downloaded from CodePlex. This tool is delivered as an ISO, one option within vCloud Director would be to upload this ISO and attach it to your Windows 2008 Server Core virtual machine as needed, this may provide some additional security however it isn’t necessarily convenient. Personally, I opted to copy the contents of the ISO to a directory within my Windows 2008 Server Core template so that it is readily available.

Microsoft states that Core Configurator supports the following tasks:

  • Product Licensing
  • Networking Features
  • DCPromo Tool
  • ISCSI Settings
  • Server Roles and Features
  • User and Group Permissions
  • Share Creation and Deletion
  • Dynamic Firewall settings
  • Display | Screensaver Settings
  • Add & Remove Drivers
  • Proxy settings
  • Windows Updates (Including WSUS)
  • Multipath I/O
  • Hyper-V including virtual machine thumbnails
  • JoinDomain and Computer rename
  • Add/remove programs
  • Services
  • WinRM
  • Complete logging of all commands executed

In order to launch Core Configurator, you simply navigate to the directory that contains it and run Start_Coreconfig.wsf (default for attached ISO this would likely be D:\Start_Coreconfig.wsf), which presents this interface:

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Selecting the small expansion arrow at the bottom reveals a few more convenient options:

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Control Panel view:

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I was able to use this tool to install all of the latest Microsoft hotfix packages, the interface could use a “select all” option…but then again, you generally want to review what you are installing and this encourages you to do so. You must select the hotfix to be installed one at a time.

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Firewall Settings

You can easily view and modify the Firewall Settings:

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Conclusion

Without the GUI we are accustomed to, even the most basic tasks become challenging. Perhaps you know how to configure interfaces, join an Active Directory domain, or even change the computer name from command line on Windows; this task was previously foreign to me. Just how much do we save by using Core instead of a full version of Windows 2008 Server? Here is a screen shot taken from vCenter on resource utilization for this particular Windows 2008 Server Core (R2 x64):

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Here is the same resource accounting for a similar (base) config for Windows 2008 R2 Standard:

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Notice the Active Guest Memory of each of the above? With only default installation + VMware Tools installed thats a 47% decrease in active memory, it is also a ~decrease of ~20% decrease in storage capacity to support the base OS. While this isn’t much in a large production environment, however I don’t have the luxury of a Cisco UCS B230 with 32-DIMM slots for my lab…when my host only has 16GB of RAM, that increases the number of base OS I can support…again, the easiest unit of X to conserve is the one you don’t use.

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